How Much Your Memory Will Improve Without The Alcohol Drug?

How Much Your Memory Will Improve Without The Alcohol Drug? (Transcript)

I’m Kevin O’Hara for Alcohol Mastery and today I want to talk about the benefit of quitting drinking which is that your memory will improve hugely.

I spoke a couple of weeks ago and I spoke at length about how much my memory has improved since I quit drinking and how many memories I’ve lost while I was drinking. I think there are very few people around, very few heavy drinkers, who don’t understand this concept, the concept of waking up in the morning and not having a bloody clue what the hell went on the night before – what you were doing, who you were with, what you said, what you did.

It’s all just a perfect blank and it’s not surprising considering that alcohol is one of the few things that gets through the blood-brain barrier, that essential part of your brain that just really keeps your brain clean and free and gives you the ability to think.

This is the thing that has brought us from the trees and to do what we’re doing today. We’re capable of so much because we’ve got big brains and we’ve got the brains that have the capacity to think, to plan, to make decisions and all that depends on having a clean brain.

When you put an industrial cleaner in there, there’s going to be some repercussions and consequences to that.

When you first start drinking, during those first few sessions, you might find it hard to sort of remember small little details, you might find it difficult to remember somebody’s name from the night before, or something that was said. But the more you drink, the less you will be able to remember. And as you get older and older, the more your drink, you start going through what is known as a “blackout” where there are huge chunks of your past that have just gone, disappeared into nothingness… and like I’ve said before, if those huge chunks are anything to do with the absolute best times of your life, the times when you’re supposed to remember, then that’s a massive, massive loss for anybody.

You often heard about the grandpa and granny sitting on a rocking chair. They’re sort of in the twilight of their lives, and they get out the photograph album, just to see these great times from their past, when they did one thing or another, and they say – “Do you remember that?” “Do you remember this?” and “Do you remember what he said? And what they said?”

When I hear people talking about what people said 20 years ago, it makes me sad [because I don’t have a lot of those memories].

But that’s as it is anyway, when you do quit drinking, your memory will improve hugely. Your memory is your connection with the past. Your memory should be there forever. It’s all you’ve got to connect you with times well spent.

That’s one thing about myself now is I know I’ll always going to have those memories in the future. If you have any questions, just give us a shout. If you haven’t signed up for the newsletter yet, go to the website and do that. The new book should be out soon, should be out this week or next week, 7 Steps to Alcohol Freedom and so until next time, I’m Kevin O’Hara for Alcohol Mastery, have a great week, onwards and upwards.

Please leave a comment below if you have a story or suggestion that might help other readers – thanks!

Some Previous Posts From Alcohol Mastery

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What is Recovery?
What Are Your Reasons To Drink?

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About The Author

Kevin O'Hara

If you want help quitting drinking alcohol, I recommend you join our Mastermind Coaching Program. Here you will find all the help you need with daily exclusive informative videos, Q&A's, and monthly Roundtables on relevant topics. The Mastermind Coaching Group has many supportive members at various stages of their journey. Here you'll find non-judgemental motivation, support, and accountability. Click here for more information.

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